How To Configure WordPress Reading Settings

Learn how to configure your WordPress Reading Settings in this step-by-step tutorial.

How To Configure WordPress Reading Settings - Step-By-Step TutorialThis tutorial is part of our WordPress configuration step-by-step tutorials, where we show you how to set up and configure your WordPress site or blog with no coding skills required.

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After configuring your site’s Writing Settings, the next step is to configure your Reading Settings.

There are only a few settings to configure in this section, but these are very important. Your WordPress Reading settings let you specify what visitors will see on your home page and allow you to configure important RSS feed and search engine indexing settings.

The tutorial below shows you how to configure your WordPress Reading Settings.

How To Configure Your WordPress Settings – Tutorial

Click on Settings > Reading in your WordPress dashboard menu …

WordPress Settings - Reading Settings

(Settings Menu – Reading)

This brings up the ‘Reading Settings’ screen in your web browser …

WordPress - Reading Settings

(WordPress – Reading Settings Screen)

Reading Settings Screen

As mentioned in the introduction section of this tutorial, there are only a few settings to configure in this section, but these are very important.

Let’s go through and show you how to configure these settings:

WordPress Reading Settings – Home Page Display Options

The Reading Settings section lets you decide if you want to display a list of your latest posts or an individual page as your website’s home page.

If you have not created any WordPress Pages for your site yet, then the first option you will see on this screen is the option to specify how many WordPress Posts will display on your home page …

Reading Settings - 'Blog pages show at most' settings

(Reading Settings – ‘Blog pages show at most’ settings)

If your site has at least one WordPress Page, then you will see the following option at the top of this screen instead …

Reading Settings - 'Front page' displays settings

(Reading Settings – ‘Front page’ displays settings)

These options allow you to choose what your visitors will see when they arrive on your site via your home page.

WordPress Reading Settings – Displaying An Individual Page As Your Home Page

If you have created at least one page on your website, select one of the following options from the ‘Front page displays’ section:

  • Your latest posts – Your visitors will see your latest blog posts when they visit your site.
  • An individual page – Your visitors will be shown a specific page when they visit your home page (e.g. a “welcome” page, or a page with sales copy, e-commerce store catalog page, etc.), much like a traditional “static” website.

The screenshot below shows you the difference between choosing to display a WordPress page vs. displaying your latest posts on your home page …

Displaying a WordPress page vs your latest blog posts on your home page

(Displaying a WordPress page vs your latest blog posts on your home page)

Practical Tip

To learn how to specify a WordPress page as the main page of your website, see the tutorial below:

WordPress Reading Settings – Displaying Your Latest Blog Posts On Your Home Page

If you have not created a page on your website yet (i.e. you have set up a blog that only publishes posts), then your home page will display your latest blog posts by default. If your website already has pages but you want to display your latest blog posts on your home page, then select Front page displays > Your latest posts

Reading Settings: Front page displays - Your latest posts

(Reading Settings: Front page displays – Your latest posts)

You can also specify how many posts you would like displayed on your posts page by entering a number in the Blog pages show at most [xxx] posts field …

You can specify the number of blog posts to display on your home page

(You can specify the number of blog posts to display on your home page)

Practical Tip

To learn how to set the number of blog posts to display on your blog pages, see the tutorial below:

If you want to display a specific page as your home page and a summary of your latest blog posts on a separate page, then you will need to create a blog page in WordPress.

Reading Settings - 'Front page' displays settings

(Reading Settings – ‘Front page’ displays settings”)

To learn how to create a blog page in WordPress to display a summary of your blog posts, see the tutorial below:

WordPress Reading Settings – Syndication Feed Settings

You can adjust some of your WordPress RSS Feed features to determine how the information from your site will be sent to a reader’s web browser or other applications that use RSS feeds.

WordPress Reading Settings - Syndication Feed Settings

(WordPress Reading Settings – Syndication Feed Settings)

Every WordPress site has a built-in RSS page that automatically displays feeds of your posts …

Post entries in your WordPress RSS feed

(Post entries in your WordPress RSS feed)

To learn more about syndicating content and increasing traffic with your built-in WordPress RSS feed, see the tutorial below:

Let’s go through your configuration options for this section.

Syndication Feeds Show The Most Recent …

The settings in the Syndication Feeds section allow you to specify how many feeds display on your RSS feeds page.

So, for example, if you specify “5” items to show in the Syndication feeds show the most recent [xxx] items field …

Specify how many items you want to display in your RSS feeds

(Specify how many items you want to display in your RSS feeds)

Your WordPress RSS feed page will display the 5 most recent items …

Your WordPress RSS feed page - 5 items displayed

(Your WordPress RSS feed page – 5 items displayed)

If you change the number of items to something higher like “15”, for example …

Change the number of items to display in your syndication feeds

(Change the number of items to display in your syndication feeds)

Your WordPress RSS feed page will display the 15 most recent posts, and so on …

You can control the number of items displayed in your feeds

(You can control the number of items displayed in your feeds)

For Each Article In A Feed Show …

The settings in this section affect how your RSS feeds display to external feed readers (i.e. when your feeds are syndicated externally).

Note

It’s important not to confuse the option to display Full Text or Summary of RSS feeds with how post excerpts display on your site.

To learn more about using WordPress post excerpts, including how to change the length of your post excerpts, see the tutorial below:

When users syndicate your feed or view your feeds using a feedreader, what they see on their browser will depend on the option you specify in the For each article in a feed, show setting, as follows: 

  • Full Text – Displays your entire blog post in a feed.
  • Summary – Display either the excerpt of your post (if you create one), or a teaser containing the first 55 words of your post. (See this tutorial to learn more about using WordPress post excerpts).

Let’s take a look at what happens when you choose the Full Text vs Summary option.

Full Text

If you select For Each Article In A Feed Show > Full Text …

For Each Article In A Feed Show > Full Text selected

(For Each Article In A Feed Show > Full Text option selected)

This is what your feeds are going to look like when viewed with a feedreader …

Feedreader service shows full post text from your RSS feed

(Feedreader service displays full post text from your RSS feed.)

Summary

If you select For Each Article In A Feed Show > Summary …

For Each Article In A Feed Show > Summary selected

(For Each Article In A Feed Show > Summary option selected)

Then only a summary of your posts will display when your feed is run through a feedreader service …

Feedreader shows post summary from your RSS feed

(Feedreader displays post summary only)

Useful Info

While your choice to select either of the above options comes down mostly to personal preference, if you choose to display the full content of your posts in your RSS feeds (by selecting the ‘Full Text’ option), other users can syndicate the entire content of your articles, including software designed to “scrape” (i.e. steal) content, and republish your posts in their entirety. This is how “spam blogs” (also called splogs) get content.

Unless you have a specific reason to syndicate your posts in their entirety, therefore, consider selecting the “Summary” option instead of “Full Text” until you learn how to configure your WordPress RSS feeds to credit you as the original author. This will then automatically create an attribution to every post you publish and post a link back to your site from external sites that syndicate (or even scrape) your content.

To better understand this, take a look at the screenshots below.

Here is what entries in a default WordPress RSS feed look like …

Default WordPress RSS feed entries

(Default WordPress RSS feed entries)

Here is the same RSS feed with post attributions added …

WordPress RSS feeds with post attributions

(WordPress RSS feeds with post attributions)

To learn how to set up RSS feeds with attribution links, see the tutorial below:

WordPress Reading Settings – Search Engine Visibility

The WordPress Reading Settings section also lets you configure settings aimed at discouraging search engines from indexing your site …

Search Engine Visibility

(Search Engine Visibility)

Typically, you will want search engines to find your site and index your pages, so you would leave the Discourage search engines from indexing this site checkbox unticked.

If you check the box to discourage search engines from indexing your site, WordPress adds code to files in your server instructing search engine spiders to ignore your site and stops transmitting information to all of the pinging services you have added to the “Update Services” area in your Writing Settings section, effectively blocking this service.

With search engines discouraged from indexing your site, you will see the message “WordPress is not notifying any Update Services because of your site’s visibility settings” in the Writing Settings > Update Services section …

You can block WordPress from automatically notifying update services.

(You can block WordPress from automatically notifying update services)

You will also see a message on your dashboard reminding you that you have enabled this option …

WordPress Dashboard - Search Engines Discouraged

(WordPress Dashboard – Search Engines Discouraged)

Useful Information

There may be situations where you may not want search engines to index your site. For example, a WordPress site set up for private use or internal purposes only like training staff, documenting internal processes, testing different plugins, themes, or configurations, or running applications that require a dedicated WordPress site installation.

Selecting the option to discourage search engines from indexing your site doesn’t block out search engines completely. To prevent search engines from indexing your WordPress site or blog requires configuring additional settings. As stated in the ‘Search Engine Visibility’ description, it is up to search engines to honor your request.

To learn how to block search engines from indexing your WordPress site, see the tutorial below:

Click ‘Save Changes’ when you have finished configuring your settings …

Save changes to update your settings

(Save changes to update your settings)

WordPress Writing Settings – Additional Information

Installing plugins and themes on your WordPress site can add new settings to your WordPress Writing Settings section …

Plugins and themes can add additional settings to the WordPress Reading Settings section

(Plugins and themes can add additional settings to the WordPress Reading Settings section)

Congratulations! Now you know how to configure your WordPress Reading Settings. The next step is to configure your WordPress Discussion Settings.

Configure WordPress - Reading Settings

Next Step: Click Here To Learn How To Configure Your WordPress Discussion Settings

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How To Configure WordPress General Settings

Learn how to configure your WordPress General Settings in this step-by-step tutorial.

Configuring WordPress - General SettingsThis tutorial is part of our WordPress configuration tutorial series, where we show you how to set up and configure your WordPress site or blog with no coding skills required.

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After cleaning up your new WordPress installation, the next step is to go through and configure your WordPress settings.

WordPress Settings Menu

(WordPress Settings Menu)

Your WordPress Settings comprise of the following sections:

Important Info

As new plugins and themes get added to your site, you will find that new items will be added to your Settings menu …

Plugins and themes can add new items to your Settings menu

(Plugins and themes can add new items to your Settings menu)

In this tutorial, you will learn how to configure your WordPress General Settings.

How To Configure WordPress – General Settings

Click on Settings > General in your WordPress menu …

WordPress Settings Menu - General

(WP Settings – General Settings)

The ‘General Settings’ page will display in your browser …

WordPress General Settings Screen

(WordPress General Settings Screen)

The WordPress ‘General Settings’ screen controls most of the basic configuration settings for your site, including:

  • The title and location of your website.
  • Who can register on your site as a user, member, etc.
  • How WordPress calculates and displays your site’s dates and times.

Important Info

For a complete description of General Settings features (we have included general descriptions of these features below for ease of reference), see the official WordPress documentation page here:

To configure your WordPress General Settings, complete the fields and options listed below:

1) Site Title: Enter your website or blog’s name here. Most themes will display this title at the top of {every page|your pages] and in your visitors’ browser title bar. WordPress also uses this title in your syndication feeds.

2) Tagline: In a few words, explain what your site is about. You can enter your slogan or a tagline. A tagline is a short phrase or sentence used to convey the essence of the site and catch your reader’s attention.

3) WordPress Address (URL): This field should display the full URL of the directory where you have installed WordPress.

For example, if you have installed WordPress into a directory called “blog”, then your WordPress address should display as http://yourdomain.com/blog.

If you have installed WordPress correctly, there should be no need to modify the information in this field.

4) Site Address (URL): Enter the address you want people to type into their browser to reach your WordPress site. This is the directory where WordPress’ main index.php file is installed.

Notes:

  • If you have installed WordPress into your main directory (i.e. if you are using WordPress as your main website), the URL will display as http://yourdomain.com without the end slash (/).
  • If you have installed WordPress correctly, there should be no need to modify the information in this field.
  • For most setups, the Site Address (URL) should look just like the WordPress Address (URL) unless you need to move your WordPress installation files to a different directory in your domain but still would like visitors to access your site via the root domain.
  • If you change the URL from http://yourdomain.com (i.e. no www) to http://www.yourdomain.com in the General Settings screen, WordPress may log you out of the site after saving your settings. If this happens, simply log in again and continue working as normal. The new URL will be updated in the WordPress database.

Info

WordPress allows you to install your website into a subdirectory (e.g. http://yourdomain.com/wordpress), but have your home page served from the website root directory (e.g. http://yourdomain.com). If you need to move WordPress to another directory, click on the link in the Site Address (URL) description section or refer to the instructions in the official WordPress documentation page here: Giving WordPress Its Own Directory …

Give WordPress its own directory

(You can give WordPress its own directory)

Warning

Changing your WordPress Site Address URL requires editing code inside WordPress templates. Unless this is absolutely required, we recommend leaving the settings in this section as they are. If you are not comfortable editing code, please consider using the services of a professional.

5) Email Address: WordPress will send messages and notifications regarding the administration and maintenance of your WordPress site to this address.

Notes:

  • Your website administration email address can be different than the address you specify for your admin user account (the admin account email address is sent an email only when someone submits a comment to a post created by the user “admin”).
  • The address you enter in this field will never be displayed on your site.

6) Membership: If you plan to allow other people to register as users on your site (e.g. for a membership site, customer account, or private access to certain areas), check this option. If not, leave this option unchecked.

7) New User Default Role: If you did not check the “Membership” checkbox above then ignore this section. This drop-down menu allows you to select the default role that will be assigned to new users or registered members added via the Administration > Users > Users Screen.

The options are:

  • Administrator
  • Editor
  • Author
  • Contributor
  • Subscriber

We explain what different WordPress user levels mean in various tutorials in the training module below:

Important

The time and date settings described below can affect WordPress plugins and services that integrate features on your site like making bookings, sending reminders, or setting appointments.

8) Timezone: Select your city or timezone from the drop-down menu, or just ignore this setting.

9) Date Format: Choose the format that you would like to use to display dates on your site, or just ignore this option. The Date Format setting is typically used by themes to display dates on your site, but it does not control how dates are displayed inside your administrative screens (for example, when managing posts).

10) Time Format: Choose the format that you would like to use to display times on your site, or just ignore this option. The Time Format setting is typically used by themes to display time on your site, but does not control how times are displayed in your administrative screens (for example, when editing a post’s timestamp).

11) Week Starts On: This option controls how the WordPress calendar displays its first column …

WordPress General Settings - WordPress Calendar settings

(WordPress General Settings – WordPress Calendar settings)

12) Site Language: Specify the language to be used in your dashboard …

View your WordPress dashboard in another language

(View your WordPress dashboard in other languages)

13) Once you have entered all of the above settings in this section, click Save Changes to update your settings.

To review and further edit your Site Title and Tagline, go to My WordPress Site > Visit Site (tip: to view your home page and continue working on your settings, open a separate window by right-clicking on the ‘Visit Site’ link and choosing “Open Link In New Tab”) …

My WordPress Site > Visit Site

(My WordPress Site > Visit Site)

Your Site Title and Tagline display on your site and in your visitors’ web browser …

View your Site Title and Tagline

(View your Site Title and Tagline)

Useful Tip

You can also view some of the changes you make to your General Settings like your Site Title and Tagline without leaving your WordPress dashboard by going to the WordPress Theme Customizer section (select Appearance > Customize in the dashboard menu) …

WordPress Theme Customizer

(WordPress Theme Customizer)

Learn more about using the WordPress Theme Customizer in this training module:

Useful Info

Note: Because WordPress keeps your site’s content separate from your web design (web design is controlled by your active WordPress theme), the information entered for your Site Title and Tagline will remain the same regardless of the themes used in your site. WordPress themes and WordPress plugins, however, can affect how titles and taglines appear on your website.

Congratulations! Now you know how to configure your WordPress General Settings.

Configuring WordPress General Settings - Step-By-Step Tutorial

Next Step: Configure Your WordPress Site: Writing Settings

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How To Clean Up A New WordPress Installation

Have you installed a new Wordpress site or blog on your domain? Learn how to clean up your new WordPress installation like an expert in this step-by-step tutorial.

How To Clean Up A New WordPress InstallationThis tutorial is part of our WordPress configuration tutorial series, where we show you how to set up and configure your WordPress site or blog with no coding skills required.

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Although a new WordPress site can be used “right out of the box” immediately after installation, there are a number of internal and external settings that you can configure to help you get the most benefit out of using WordPress.

In other tutorials, we talk about the importance of getting your WordPress site expertly configured. This is important if you plan to build a successful digital presence, as we will show you not just how to create a professional looking website, but also how to set up your WordPress website or blog to help you get better search engine results, generate more traffic, convert more visitors into leads and sales, and so much more!

Important

Before you start, we recommend that you go through the following training modules:

In addition to the comprehensive tutorials in the WordPress configuration module, we also recommend watching the videos listed in our WordPress Configuration Video Tutorials section and learning how to put your WordPress site on maintenance mode.

If you have followed our WordPress Installation Tutorials, the next step is to set up and configure your site to turn your default WordPress installation into a professional looking website or blog that will create a great first impression with visitors and help you grow your business online faster.

In this tutorial, we will begin the configuration process by learning how to clean up a new WordPress installation on your domain, then take you step-by-step through the process of configuring your WordPress settings and getting your website fully set up.

Cleaning Up WordPress Post Installation

After your new WordPress installation is complete, log into your WordPress administration area …

Log into WordPress

(Log into WordPress)

The first step of the post installation clean up is to read and dismiss any messages and notices that are cluttering your WordPress dashboard.

Read and dismiss notices cluttering your dashboard

(Read and dismiss notices cluttering your dashboard)

Tip

The first time you log into a new WordPress site, you may be greeted by the Welcome to WordPress Screen

New WordPress Site - Welcome To WordPress!

(New WordPress Site – Welcome To WordPress!)

You can explore some of the suggested steps in the Welcome Screen

WordPress Welcome Screen - Suggested Steps

(WordPress Welcome Screen – Suggested Steps)

If you want to spend a few minutes learning more about WordPress, you can visit the official WordPress site for an overview of their recommended “Getting Started” process.

Info

If you are installing and configuring your own WordPress site, we recommend ignoring the “get started” suggestions presented in the default WordPress installation notices and following our step-by-step tutorials instead. We have designed our tutorials in logical and sequential order to help reduce your learning curve and get you up and running without having to “backtrack” important steps later.

To dismiss the welcome screen for subsequent logins, click on the ‘Dismiss’ link …

Dismiss The WordPress Welcome Screen

(Dismiss The WordPress Welcome Screen)

If for any reason you need access to the WordPress welcome screen again, just click on the ‘Screen Options’ tab at the top of your WordPress dashboard screen and tick the ‘Welcome’ checkbox …

Screen Options - Welcome

(Screen Options – Welcome)

The ’Welcome to WordPress’ screen will be restored to your dashboard screen and greet you next time you log in …

Welcome screen is back!

(Welcome screen is back!)

To learn more about the WordPress Dashboard, see this tutorial:

WordPress Sample Content

When a new WordPress installation is performed, sample content is automatically added to your blog so you can visualize what your site will look like …

Sample content added in new WordPress installation!

(Sample content added in new WordPress installation!)

This sample content is added regardless of the version of WordPress you are installing, or the default theme used in the installation …

Sample content is added to all new WordPress installations!

(Sample content is added to all new WordPress installations!)

If you have never used WordPress before, we recommend spending a few minutes browsing through the sample content prior to commencing the configuration and setup process. After familiarizing yourself with these sections, it’s best to then completely delete the sample content from your site, as you will soon be replacing these with real content of your own.

How To Clean Up A New WordPress Blog Installation – Step-By-Step Tutorial

Go to your Dashboard screen …

Let's delete this sample content!

(Let’s delete this sample content!)

You will see that WordPress has automatically added the following sample content to your site after the installation:

  • 1 x Post
  • 1 x Page
  • 1 x Category
  • 1 x Comment

Cleaning Up WordPress – Deleting The Sample Comment

Let’s begin cleaning up your new WordPress installation by deleting the comment from Mr. WordPress displayed in the “Recent Comments” section.

Position your mouse cursor over the comment and a menu will appear under the comment. Click on the ‘Trash’ link  …

Recent Comments - Trash

(Recent Comments – Trash)

The comment will be moved to the Trash folder. If you want to restore it, just click on the Undo link next to the Comment by xxx moved to the Trash message …

Sample comment deleted

(Sample comment deleted)

To permanently delete the comment in your trash folder, click on the Trash link …

Let's permanently delete this sample comment!

(Let’s permanently delete this sample comment!)

You will be taken to the WordPress ‘Comments’ screen …

WordPress Comments screen

(WordPress Comments section)

You can permanently delete the comment by hovering over the item and clicking on the ‘ Delete Permanently’ link …

WordPress Comments screen - Delete Permanently

(WordPress Comments screen – Delete Permanently)

You can also select the checkbox next to the comment you want to permanently delete, and click on the Empty Trash button …

WordPress Comments area - Empty Trash

(WordPress Comments area – Empty Trash)

The sample WordPress comment will be permanently deleted …

Sample comment is now permanently deleted!

(Sample comment is now permanently deleted!)

We provide step-by-step tutorials about managing WordPress comments in the WordPress Management Tutorials module.

After deleting the sample comment, the next step is to delete the sample post.

Cleaning Up WordPress – Deleting The Sample Post

Go to your Dashboard and click on Posts > All Posts

WordPress Posts Menu - All Posts

(WP Posts Menu – All Posts)

This brings you to the Posts page …

Posts section

(Posts page)

Place your mouse over the sample post title (Hello world!) and a menu will display. Click on Trash to delete the sample post …

WordPress Posts - Trash

(WordPress Posts – Trash)

The sample WordPress post will be moved to the Trash folder. If you want to restore it just click on the Undo link next to the post moved to the Trash message …

WordPress Sample Post Deleted

(WordPress Post Deleted)

The sample post will be removed, but not permanently deleted.

To learn how to permanently delete WordPress posts, see the tutorial below:

After deleting the sample WordPress post, the next step is to delete the sample WordPress page.

Cleaning Up WordPress – Delete The Sample Page

WordPress adds a sample page to new installations …

WordPress Sample Page

(WordPress Sample Page)

Unless deleted, this sample will continue to display on your website, even if you decide to change your WordPress theme

The Sample Page remains on your site even if you change WordPress themes unless deleted.

(The Sample Page will remain on your site even if you change WordPress themes unless deleted.)

You could just keep the sample page and replace the content with real content, but you would then have to change other settings (like the post slug) and miss out on some valuable opportunities to instantly notify search engines and attract new visitors when you publish new content (we’ll show you how to configure WordPress to do this later in this tutorial module).

As you will be adding real pages to your site shortly, let’s just simply delete this page.

To delete the sample page, go to your Admin menu and click on Pages > All Pages

WordPress Pages Menu - All Pages

(Pages Menu – All Pages)

This opens the WordPress ‘Pages’ section …

WordPress Pages section

(Pages area)

Place your mouse below the “Sample Page” entry and a menu will display. Click on Trash to delete the sample page …

WordPress Pages - Trash

(WordPress Pages – Trash)

The sample WordPress page will be moved to the Trash folder. If you want to restore it just click on the Undo link next to the Item moved to the Trash message …

WordPress Page Deleted

(WordPress Sample Page Deleted)

Your sample page will be removed, but not permanently deleted.

To learn how to permanently delete the page, see this tutorial:

After deleting the sample WordPress page, the next step is to delete the sample page.

Now that you have deleted the sample page, the next step is to delete unnecessary WordPress plugins.

Cleaning Up WordPress – Deleting Unnecessary Plugins

As part of our recommended WordPress maintenance routine, it’s best to remove any unused and unnecessary plugins from your system.

WordPress automatically adds a non-essential plugin called “Hello Dolly” during the installation process. Let’s remove this plugin while we’re cleaning up our new WordPress installation.

In your dashboard menu, click on Plugins > Installed Plugins

Plugins Menu - Installed Plugins

(WP Plugins Menu – Installed Plugins)

This brings you to the WordPress ‘Plugins’ section …

Plugins page

(Plugins section)

To remove the “Hello Dolly” plugin, click Delete …

Click 'Delete' to remove the plugin

(Click ‘Delete’ to remove the plugin)

Confirm that you want to remove this plugin and delete all related files …

Delete Plugin files

(Delete Plugin confirmation screen)

The “Hello Dolly’ plugin will be deleted …

Goodbye 'Hello Dolly'

(Goodbye ‘Hello Dolly’)

Important

WordPress installs another plugin by default called Akismet. Leave the Akismet plugin in the plugins section for now. We show you how to configure and use WordPress antispam plugins in other tutorials.

To learn more about using plugins, see this tutorial:

After deleting all of the default and/or unnecessary content that WordPress automatically adds with every new installation, go back to your WordPress Dashboard. You will see that the Dashboard is empty and that the only items left are the information panels (e.g. At a Glance, Quick Draft, etc …

Empty WordPress dashboard

(Dashboard info panels)

Event these information panels are optional and can be rearranged or removed from your dashboard …

Completely empty dashboard!

(Completely empty WordPress dashboard!)

There’s no need to remove the information panels from your dashboard. Just leave things as they are, or reorganize some of the panels to suit your preferences.

To learn more about editing your WordPress dashboard, see this tutorial:

Info

One last thing to keep in mind with your new WordPress installation is that a category called ‘Uncategorized’ is automatically created for your posts …

WordPress 'Uncategorized' Category

(WordPress ‘Uncategorized’ Category)

We will not be deleting this category. The reason for this is that WordPress does not allow you to have a site with no post categories. All WordPress posts must be assigned to a post category, so the default ‘Uncategorized’ category cannot be deleted.

In other tutorials, you will learn how to set up categories and how to optimize the default WordPress category for SEO.

Congratulations! Now that you know how to clean up a new WordPress installation, the next step is to begin configuring your WordPress settings.

WordPress Post-Installation Cleanup

(Source: Pixabay)

Click the link below to continue configuring your WordPress settings:

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