Where To Install WordPress

Learn the difference between the WordPress self-hosted and hosted options and where to install WordPress on your domain.

Decide Where To Install WordPressThis tutorial is part of our WordPress installation tutorials, where we show you how to install a WordPress site or blog on your own domain name with no coding skills required.

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Now that you have planned your websiteregistered your domain name, set up your webhosting, and configured your nameservers, the next step is to decide where you are going to install your WordPress site or blog on your domain.

Decide Where To Install WordPress

In this tutorial, you will learn how to make the right strategic decision for your new WordPress installation.

Self-Hosted vs Hosted WordPress Site

WordPress offers both a self-hosted and a hosted option to set up a WordPress site or blog.

Self-Hosted WordPress

The self-hosted option allows you to download the full-featured WordPress application for free from WordPress.org and host a WordPress site or blog under your own domain name, with no limitations or conditions.

With the self-hosted version of WordPress:

  • Your website is hosted on your own domain
  • You can install and upload any WordPress plugin you want (free or paid), integrate your site with third-party applications, etc.
  • You can use any theme you like (free or paid)
  • You can fully edit your site
  • You can sell advertising on your site
  • You can set up an e-commerce store, membership site, forum group, etc.
  • You have complete freedom to use and modify your sites.
  • You handle your own site maintenance and security.

Useful Info

To learn more about why the self-hosted version of WordPress is 100% free, see these tutorials:

Hosted WordPress

WordPress will host your blog for free at WordPress.com. There are, however, limitations on what you can and can’t do if you choose to host your blog for free with WordPress.com.

With the free hosted version of WordPress:

  • WordPress.com hosts your website.
  • You get a custom WordPress.com address (e.g. yourusername.wordpress.com).
  • You cannot upload plugins of your choice.
  • You cannot upload or modify themes of your choice.
  • Hosting is free up to a limit (3GB).
  • Ads display on your site.
  • You cannot sell advertising on your site (including Google AdSense).
  • WordPress handles your site’s maintenance and security.
  • WordPress.com offers paid upgrades to access advanced features.

Below is a summary of both WordPress options …

WordPress.org vs WordPress.com

(WordPress.org vs WordPress.com)

The difference between choosing the hosted vs self-hosted WordPress has been described as the difference between having the freedom of owning your own computer (WordPress.org – self-hosted option) and the limitations of using a computer in a controlled environment like a public library (WordPress.com – hosted option).

If you plan to grow your business online using WordPress, the benefits of choosing the self-hosted option (WordPress.org) outweigh those of hosting a free blog at WordPress.com. You have full control over your web presence with no restrictions.

Useful Tip

You can overcome the limitations of the free hosting option (WordPress.com) by upgrading to a paid hosted plan, but then why not just start with a WordPress site hosted on your domain name?

WordPress Installation: Root Folder Or Subfolder?

If you’ve chosen the self-hosted option, the next step is to decide where you will install WordPress on your domain.

Use the chart below to help you decide …

Where do you plan install WordPress?

(Where will you install WordPress?)

Notes:

a) To use WordPress as your main website (e.g. www.mydomainname.com), install it in the “root” folder of your domain (i.e. the main directory). This is where people will arrive at when they type your domain name into their web browser.

b) If you have an existing website installed on your domain that you want to keep, you can either keep your existing site with a new WordPress installation, or install WordPress in a subfolder of your domain (also called a ‘subdirectory’), e.g. www.mydomainname.com/blog. You can name your subfolder anything you want.

Note: Typically most WordPress sites are installed either in the domain’s root directory or inside a domain subfolder. If, however, for some reason you have been advised to install WordPress in a subdomain (a subdomain looks like this: http://subdomain.domain.com) and want to know more about the difference between using a subdomain and a subdirectory, then refer to this tutorial: Subdomains, addon domains, and domain name aliases

c) If you have an existing website that you don’t want to delete or replace with a WordPress site, then your other option is to set up a WordPress site or blog on an entirely different domain, so that both your existing website and your WordPress site/blog show up when people enter their respective domains into their browser, e.g.:

  • www.mydomainname.com – sends visitors to your existing website.
  • www.myotherdomain.com – sends visitors to your WordPress site.

Once you have decided where to install WordPress, the next step is to create a Google Account.

Congratulations! Now you know how to set up webhosting for your WordPress website or blog.

Decide Where To Install WordPress

(Source: Shutterstock)

Click the button below to continue …

Set Up A Google Account

I Already Have A Google Account

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Author: Martin Aranovitch

Martin Aranovitch is the founder of WPCompendium.org and has authored hundreds of FREE WordPress tutorials for beginners. WPCompendium.org provides detailed step-by-step tutorials that will teach you how to use WordPress with no coding skills required and grow your business online at minimal cost!

Originally published as Where To Install WordPress.